Waikiki World War One Honor Roll Remembers Brave Soldiers

The World War One Honor Roll is across the street from the larger and more well known Waikiki Natatorium. The massive stone recognizes the 101 Hawaiian Territory soldiers who served in World War I. Each hero’s name is etched in one of three columns on the marble stone. This monument reminds us of the bravery of these people who served for United States or British forces during the war.

The Waikiki Natatorium and World War One Honor Roll are located at the east end of Waikiki Beach on Kalakaua Ave just east of Kapahulu Ave. When you visit, stop by the nearby Waikiki Aquarium and Honolulu Zoo.

World War 1 Honor Roll In Waikiki

World War 1 Honor Roll In Waikiki

 

Another Perspective of Diamond Head Honolulu Hawaii

For a real adventure talk a walk around Diamond Head. Really! Around Diamond Head! Put on your comfortable shoes because we have a long hike ahead of us. Plan on four to five miles depending on your starting location.

The best time to take this walk is just before sunrise, before the day heats up. If you are starting from Waikiki, walk along Kalakaua Avenue and listen to the quiet of the morning. Traffic is light, mostly trucks delivering food and supplies to businesses. Say “hello” to your fellow early morning walkers and those visitors too jet lagged to sleep in. As you pass the Police Station near the Duke Kahanamoku statue, watch the surfers out catching the best waves of the day. Just outside the station, inside a fenced area are the four ancient Pohaku Stones, a gift from Tahitian healers to Hawaiian residents. Watch out for maintenance workers clearing trash or sweeping sand from the sidewalks to prepare the beach for the onslaught of sun bathers.

Continue walking past Kapiolani Park but don’t stop here before dawn. On your right, you’ll pass the huge banyan trees in front of the Waikiki Aquarium and Natatorium. Continuing along Kalakaua you will see sleepy tourists outside drinking their coffee and hotel workers clearing garden debris from the sidewalk. At the end of the park, take a right onto Diamond Head Road and begin your ascent.

This stretch can get crowded with walkers, runners, bikers and surfers early in the morning. Stay to the right and out of the traffic flow. Beautiful homes are nestled into the side of the volcano. As you pass Kaluahole, Makalei and Le’Ahi Beaches, the number of cars parked on the side of the road increase. Surfers know where the best waves are. If you want to try your luck here, be aware of a long, steep decline to get to the water on sometimes unstable slopes.

Listen to the new sounds along this stretch. Roosters crowing greetings to the new day. Other colorful birds like the Red-Crested Cardinal rustle in the branches. Keep your eyes open for mongoose darting through the rocks. A few stray cats cruise by checking out the scene. Check out the view over the Pacific as the sky begins to brighten.

Soon you will pass Diamond Head Lighthouse. The original was built in 1899 and replaced in 1917. The Fresnel lens shines brightly warning ships away from the jagged shoreline. Take in the view from the street as this lighthouse stands on the current residence of the 14th Coast Guard District Commander and is not open to the public.

Continue along past Kuilei Cliffs beach where you can rest your weary feet for a moment on the lava rock wall. Say hello to the master gardeners who keep this tropical garden trim and neat. This is a prime spot to wait for the sun to crest the ocean as the day officially begins.

Next up is the Amelia Earhart Monument and parking area. Watch out for buses as this is a favorite spot for tour guides to stop for photos. The Pacific views and beaches below are breathtaking. Look along the coast to the left and see Black Point and Doris Duke’s Shangri La. Built in the 1930′s, you can now tour the home and Islamic treasures Duke collected.

Across the street is Diamond Head Park, endowed by Muriel Flanders, and can be identified by the plaque on a large stone. She led the effort to replace the weeds and garbage with native plants. We are not quite at the half way point. Let’s continue on our walk.

As we reach the top of the rise, we will take a left as Diamond Head Road turns and Kahala Road goes straight along the coast. The large park at the intersection is a common gathering spot for charity walks and other events. Now we begin our long descent on the inland side of Diamond Head.

On the right, we pass Fort Rutger Military Reservation. Several buildings out in front and gates on the side of the road further along are made from lava rocks. Few remnants remain of the former Officers Club on the left side of the street. Also on the left is the driveway into Diamond Head State Park. If you still have energy, walk into the park then hike to the top of Diamond Head for spectacular views of the Pacific Ocean, Waikiki, and Honolulu. On your .8 mile hike you will climb 560 feet above the crater floor.

If you are not up for that hike, check out the outdoor workout area in the park on the right in front of Kapiolani Community College. Then walk to the front of the college for a tour of their cactus garden and views of Kahala and Koko Head Crater. If this is Saturday morning, check out the farmers market in the college parking lot. Fresh fruits, vegetables, and delectable treats await you. Pick up a cup of Kona coffee to sip while you shop. Taste island and other exotic dishes, even bakery items. As you get back to your walk, check out the Peace Garden nestled in the hillside across from the college entrance.

Now we are on the home stretch. Honolulu and Waikiki stand before you. Diamond Head Road becomes Monsarrat Avenue as we return to the Diamond Head neighborhood. Check out the stores and restaurants like the Diamond Head Market and Grill.

Continue under the tree canopy as you walk along the fence outside the Honolulu Zoo. On the weekends, local artists display their art on the fence and chat with each other or work on new art pieces. On your right is the Waikiki Shell where you can enjoy the outdoors and listen to music. We are back at Kapiolani Park. Check out the gazebo and statues or sit on a park bench and take in the sights.

What a great way to start the day. Now you won’t feel guilty about lounging on Waikiki Beach during the afternoon.

Learn more about off the beaten path site in Honolulu with Oahu Revealed.

Earth Month Waikiki Aquarium Honolulu

The Waikiki Aquarium in Honolulu, Hawaii hosted Earth month celebrations on April 10, 2010. Free admission to drew a long line at the 9AM opening. Special interactive educational displays were popular with the keiki. Scientists, educators and volunteers were on hand to talk about sea life, invasive species, conservation and habitats. The messages were conveyed with coloring books, ring toss games and learning puzzles. A seahorse release was a highlight for many attendees.

The Waikiki Aquarium partners with Duke’s Waikiki for educational events.

In addition to the Earth month special events, we visited the ongoing exhibits including Hawaiian monk seal, puffer fish, anemones, and jellyfish. Click on the image below to view this episode of “Where Are You Today?”

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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